Bingo's Bounty Vegetables for Dogs

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Oct 2011

Prescription Fraud?


The sheer number of pet foods on the market today is so vast that manufacturers are constantly looking for ways to entice consumers into purchasing their products. There are products for puppies, mature dogs, senior citizens, small dogs, big dogs, weight loss, and the newest fad, ‘breed specific’ varieties. These foods make me shake my head and laugh.

While every breed of dog is special to their owner, the only real difference between feeding a maltese versus a great dane is portion size and calories. Make no mistake about it, age or breed specific dog foods serve no purpose other than to cater to your love of your dog and take money out of your pocket. While there may be nothing nutritionally wrong with these diets, there is nothing nutritionally special about them either.

Prescription diets, on the other hand, do not make me laugh, they make me angry. These are poorly designed foods with little to no nutritional value being sold to people whose pets are ill. These diets are strictly sold and recommended by veterinarians who have little to no nutritional training other than what the manufacturer’s representatives tell them. The manufacturers themselves donate large sums of money to veterinarian schools in exchange for having the right to say their products are “recommended by veterinarians”. Ironically, if vets actually took a few moments to read the ingredients of these diets and do a little research, they would seriously question the safety of recommending them to ill patients.

Here are but a few examples of poor quality found in the main ingredients in one of the top manufacturers of prescription diets:

Hepatic (Liver) Diet - designed for dogs with liver disease.


Company states “High quality and highly digestible protein in moderate quantities to help reduce liver workload and maintain liver function”.

Main ingredients: Brewers Rice, Pork Fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid), Dried Egg Product, Soybean Meal, Powdered Cellulose...

What you are really getting:


Brewers Rice - Processed rice product that lacks many of the nutrients contained in whole ground rice.
Pork Fat - Fancy name for lard. High in saturated oils it is not a healthy fat and can lead to pancreatitis. Used to make a poor quality food more appealing as it is very attractive to pets.
Dried Egg Product - Cheap source of protein that is the waste product of the egg industry.
Soybean Meal - A poor quality protein filler used to boost the protein content of low quality pet foods. It has a biological value of less than 50% of chicken meal.
Powdered Cellulose - Wood shavings. Cheap, useless filler.

Urinary Tract Health - designed for dogs with kidney disease.


Company states: “Reduced levels of protein, magnesium and phosphorus to help limit the building blocks of crystals...”

Main ingredients:
Whole Grain Corn,
Pork Fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid), Chicken By-Product Meal, Soybean Meal, Corn Gluten Meal, Soybean Mill Run...

What you are really getting:


Whole Grain Corn - Vegetable protein not digested well by dogs that is excreted mostly as waste. Common allergen.
Pork Fat - Fancy name for lard. High in saturated oils it is not a healthy fat and can lead to pancreatitis. Used to make a poor quality food more appealing as it is very attractive to pets.
Chicken By-Product Meal - Less expensive and less digestible protein source. Poor quality ingredients (heads, feet, bones, etc) can vary widely from batch to batch.
Soybean Meal - A poor quality protein filler used to boost the protein content of low quality pet foods. It has a biological value of less than 50% of chicken meal.
Corn Gluten Meal - Inexpensive by product of human food processing that contains some protein but it is mostly used as a binding agent.
Soybean Mill Run - Inexpensive by product of human food processing, commonly referred to as “floor sweepings”. No real nutritional value.

Gastrointestinal Health - designed for dogs with gastrointestinal issues.


Company states: “Highly digestible protein and fat...”

Main Ingredients:
Whole grain corn, Brewers Rice, Dried Egg Product, Chicken By-Product Meal, Pork Fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid), Powered Cellulose...


What you are really getting:


Whole Grain Corn - Vegetable protein not digested well by dogs that is excreted mostly as waste. Common allergen.
Brewers Rice - Processed rice product that lacks many of the nutrients contained in whole ground rice.
Dried Egg Product - Cheap source of protein that is the waste product of the egg industry.
Chicken By-Product Meal - Less expensive and less digestible protein source. Poor quality ingredients (heads, feet, bones, etc) can vary widely from batch to batch.
Pork Fat - Fancy name for lard. High in saturated oils it is not a healthy fat and can lead to pancreatitis. Used to make a poor quality food more appealing as it is very attractive to pets.
Powdered Cellulose - Wood shavings. Cheap, useless filler.

Low Fat Diabetic - designed for dogs with diabetes.


Company states: “Clinically proven to help dogs maintain a healthy weight.”

Main Ingredients:
Whole Grain Corn, Powdered Cellulose, Chicken By-Product Meal, Corn Gluten, Meal, Soybean Mill Run...

What you are really getting:


Whole Grain Corn - Vegetable protein not digested well by dogs that is excreted mostly as waste. Common allergen.
Powdered Cellulose - Wood shavings. Cheap, useless filler.
Chicken By-Product Meal - Less expensive and less digestible protein source. Poor quality ingredients (heads, feet, bones, etc) can vary widely from batch to batch.
Corn Gluten Meal - Inexpensive by product of human food processing that contains some protein but it is mostly used as a binding agent.
Soybean Mill Run - Inexpensive by product of human food processing, commonly referred to as “floor sweepings”. No real nutritional value.

These are but a few of the dogs foods being prescribed by veterinarians for dogs with health issues. They are a prime example of greedy pet food companies selling inferior products to ignorant customers using the valued reputation of veterinarians to do so. While these diets may alleviate some of the symptoms of the diseases they are designed for, they do not provide adequate nutrition for your dog, only empty calories. All of the diseases above would be better treated through a high quality,
home cooked diet that can be tailored specifically to meet your dogs nutritional needs.

Always remember that you are your dog’s only advocate. Do not be swayed by slick marketing campaigns and know that while your veterinarian is an important source of information in regards to your dog’s well being, he doesn’t often have all of the facts when it comes to nutrition.

The Amazing Austin

One of the benefits of being involved with dogs in your business is that you get to meet and hear about so many of your client’s wonderful “fur kids”. Their stories are filled with courage and stoicism, love and kindness, sacrifice and devotion, and perhaps most important of all, the ability of both species to care so deeply for each other. Such is the story of the amazing Austin.

austin2011

Austin is a 12 1/2 year old miniature poodle who belongs to the Deitchman family. Bruce Deitchman fondly describes him as “independent, aloof, snotty and when younger, a gorgeous creature,” (although we think he is still one handsome little guy). What makes Austin truly amazing is to know what he has gone through and how he wins friends and admirers wherever he goes with his positive and take-charge attitude.

His first major health concern appeared the year he turned 8. A bite from a simple tick gave him Anaplasmosis, a bacterial infection that attacks the white blood cells. He also developed Immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (ITP) a syndrome in which his body’s own immune system attacks his platelets. He ended up needing several blood transfusions, followed by eight months of close monitoring and high doses of both steroids and cyclosporine, an immunosuppressant drug.

At the age of 10, Austin experienced a seizure and tests revealed that he had a meningioma, a locally aggressive brain tumor that is difficult to treat. The Deitchman’s found an excellent neurosurgeon at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Washington State University who operated on Austin. The surgery was followed by an intense course of radiation therapy - which is why he sports a stunningly white top knot. The high doses of steroids needed during the operation led to gastrointestinal bleeding. Continued use of cortisone afterwards led to diabetes. To add insult to injury, he developed hypothyroidism, antibiotic sensitive diarrhea, a resistant urinary tract infection and food allergies. He will need to be on anti-seizure medications for the rest of his life due to his brain tumor which is currently in remission.

Throughout it all, Austin has maintained his endearing personality. Even after his brain surgery, he was allowed the run of the hospital, making the rounds with the doctors, checking in on fellow patients as if to give them moral support, and routinely sleeping in the on-call room with the emergency doctor. As Bruce describes it, “Austin is no normal dog and he was treated even there as a member of the family.”

The Deitchman’s have diligently nursed Austin back to health with a single protein source raw diet along with a specialized custom mix we here at Bingo’s Bounty put together for him. The vegetables provide fiber which balances his diet and helps with controlling his glucose levels. Bruce admits that balancing his diabetes, allergies and seizure medication has been a constant struggle, made more difficult by the fact that they have gone through five different types of insulin. While his diabetes is not 100% controlled, they have managed to keep him happy and involved. Austin enjoys his Bingo’s Bounty, and Bruce says he likes it better than anything they had previously devised.

When you read the tale of Austin, you find yourself in awe of the measures the Deitchman’s have gone through to help their little man. Bruce states, “It is hard to explain to non-pet people the compulsions that make us take such extraordinary measures to take care of a complicated and unusual animal. To us the rewards are obvious.”

Well, Bruce, I think it’s not as hard to explain as you think... those of us who love our dogs as if they were children know exactly how you feel.

We wish Austin a long, healthy life. We know he is well loved.

Austin before he became ill...

austin6
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